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Tannhäuser and the Singers' Contest at Wartburg tickets

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Tannhäuser and the Singers' Contest at Wartburg

Venue: Deutsche Oper Berlin

 
Deutsche Oper Berlin
Bismarckstraße 35
10627 Berlin
 
 
All dates
Season 2019
 

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Event details
 
Composer: Richard Wagner

Tannhäuser and the Singers' Contest at Wartburg
Romantic opera in three acts; First performed on 19th October, 1845 in Dresden; Premiered at the Deutsche Oper Berlin on 30th November 2008
Richard Wagner (1813 – 1883)
In German with German and English surtitles

Tannhäuser longs to return from the realm of Venus to his terrestrial existence. Only by invoking the Virgin Mary does he manage to escape from the Goddess. Hermann of Thuringia and his assembly of noble huntsmen welcome the long-lost Tannhäuser. The prospect of being reunited with his beloved Elisabeth prompts him to return home. A song contest is held in Wartburg Castle with the aim of defining the essence of love. The invited contestants sing of the purity of the emotion while Tannhäuser praises the passion of Venus. His open avowal of lust infuriates the assembly, and they prepare to take up arms against him, but Elizabeth, herself wounded, manages to protect him. The Landgrave decrees that Tannhäuser must travel to Rome to atone for his sins. The pilgrims return without Tannhäuser, however; he alone has not obtained the forgiveness of the Pope. He faces eternal damnation; hoping to avoid his doom, he returns to Venus. The evocation of Elisabeth's name brings him to his senses: confronted with her death, his unquiet soul finds redemption at last.

The theatre as a setting of dreams: Working from the premise that Venus and Elisabeth represent only two personalities among myriad permutations of character, Wagner's opera becomes the point of departure for an exploration of the facets and possibilities of human togetherness. There are many layers to this opera; they include the mediaeval moral code, to which the persons in this work are subjected on the surface, and the changes of perspective made possible by the conflicting dispositions within a given individual. It is no longer the person in conflict who is the focus of attention but far more the person causing the conflict – Venus / Elisabeth. This is TANNHÄUSER through the eyes of the one woman who is far more than simply whore or saint. Beyond the “either-or” situation it is the exploration of the “Art of Loving” that interests us.

 
Program details
 

Conductor: Sebastian Weigle 
Stefan Blunier (05.05.2019 | 11.05.2019)
Director: Kirsten Harms 
Stage-design, Costume-design: Bernd Damovsky 
Assistance costume-design: Inga Timm 
Choreography: Silvana Schröder 
Chorus Master: Jeremy Bines 
Landgraf Hermann: Ante Jerkunica 
Albert Pesendorfer (05.05.2019 | 11.05.2019)
Tannhauser: Simon O'Neill 
Stephen Gould (05.05.2019)
Peter Seiffert (11.05.2019)
Wolfram: Markus Brück 
Simon Keenlyside (05.05.2019 | 11.05.2019)
Walther: Attilio Glaser 
Clemens Bieber (05.05.2019 | 11.05.2019)
Biterolf: Noel Bouley 
Seth Carico (05.05.2019 | 11.05.2019)
Heinrich: Jörg Schörner 
Reinmar: Andrew Harris 
Venus, Elisabeth: Allison Oakes 
Emma Bell (05.05.2019 | 11.05.2019)
Shepherd: Nicole Haslett 
Chorus: Chor der Deutschen Oper Berlin 
Orchestra: Orchester der Deutschen Oper Berlin

 
Venue
 
Deutsche Oper Berlin
 

The Deutsche Oper Berlin is an opera company located in the Charlottenburg district of Berlin, Germany. The resident building is the country's second largest opera house and also home to the Berlin State Ballet.

The company's history goes back to the Deutsches Opernhaus built by the then independent city of Charlottenburg—the "richest town of Prussia"—according to plans designed by Heinrich Seeling from 1911. It opened on November 7, 1912 with a performance of Beethoven's Fidelio, conducted by Ignatz Waghalter. After the incorporation of Charlottenburg by the 1920 Greater Berlin Act, the name of the resident building was changed to Städtische Oper (Municipal Opera) in 1925.

Deutsches Opernhaus, 1912
With the Nazi Machtergreifung in 1933, the opera was under control of the Reich Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda. Minister Joseph Goebbels had the name changed back to Deutsches Opernhaus, competing with the Berlin State Opera in Mitte controlled by his rival, the Prussian minister-president Hermann Göring. In 1935, the building was remodeled by Paul Baumgarten and the seating reduced from 2300 to 2098. Carl Ebert, the pre-World War II general manager, chose to emigrate from Germany rather than endorse the Nazi view of music, and went on to co-found the Glyndebourne opera festival in England. He was replaced by Max von Schillings, who acceded to enact works of "unalloyed German character". Several artists, like the conductor Fritz Stiedry or the singer Alexander Kipnis followed Ebert into emigration. The opera house was destroyed by a RAF air raid on 23 November 1943. Performances continued at the Admiralspalast in Mitte until 1945. Ebert returned as general manager after the war.

After the war, the company in what was now West Berlin used the nearby building of the Theater des Westens until the opera house was rebuilt. The sober design by Fritz Bornemann was completed on 24 September 1961. The opening production was Mozart's Don Giovanni. The new building opened with the current name.

 
 
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